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Pregnancy Intentions of First Time Mothers

Title: Pregnancy Intentions of First Time Mothers: Depressive Symptoms, Parenting Stress, Coparenting Satisfaction, and Child Behavioral Outcomes over the First Three Years.
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Name(s): Claridge, Amy Marie, author
McWey, Lenore M., professor directing dissertation
Karioth, Sally, university representative
Cui, Ming, committee member
Holtrop, Kendal, committee member
Department of Family and Child Sciences, degree granting department
Florida State University, degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Unplanned pregnancy is prevalent in the United States and has been linked to challenges for both mothers and their children over time. However, existing literature is limited by unrepresentative samples, retrospective reports of pregnancy intention, and lack of theoretical guidance. Studies have not yet identified mechanisms through which pregnancy intention is associated with children's outcomes, to sufficiently inform clinical practice. This current study addressed these limitations through inclusion of an at-risk sample of 224 first-time mothers from the Predicting and Preventing Neglect in Teen Mothers Study, assessing pregnancy intention during the third trimester of pregnancy, and testing mechanisms in the association between pregnancy intention and children's outcomes which were hypothesized by Family Systems Theory. The study also examined reciprocal associations among hypothesized mediators, including maternal depressive symptoms, parenting stress, and coparenting satisfaction. Mediation analyses revealed that both parenting stress and coparenting satisfaction when children were 24 months old served as mechanisms in the association between unplanned pregnancy and children's social-emotional competence at 36 months. Additionally, a cross-lagged longitudinal model suggested multiple pathways through which unplanned pregnancy was associated with children's externalizing, internalizing, dysregulation, and social-emotional competence at 36 months. Maternal depressive symptoms tended to predict later parenting stress which, in turn, was associated with later coparenting satisfaction and children's behavioral outcomes. Implications for future research are discussed, including collection of data from multiple respondents and assessment of pregnancy intention prospectively. Clinical implications for work with at-risk parents are also outlined. Specifically, the results suggest that early intervention with mothers experiencing unplanned pregnancies to specifically address depressive symptoms, parenting stress, and coparenting may serve to promote healthy outcomes among their children over time.
Identifier: FSU_migr_etd-8956 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Family and Child Sciences in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.
Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2014.
Date of Defense: May 20, 2014.
Keywords: At-Risk Families, Children, Coparenting, Depression, Parenting, Pregnancy Intention
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Lenore M. McWey, Professor Directing Dissertation; Sally Karioth, University Representative; Ming Cui, Committee Member; Kendal Holtrop, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Families
Children
Life cycle, Human
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-8956
Host Institution: FSU

Choose the citation style.
Claridge, A. M. (2014). Pregnancy Intentions of First Time Mothers: Depressive Symptoms, Parenting Stress, Coparenting Satisfaction, and Child Behavioral Outcomes over the First Three Years. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-8956