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Hot Hand and Psychological Momentum as Adaptive Beliefs in Sport

Title: The Hot Hand and Psychological Momentum as Adaptive Beliefs in Sport.
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Name(s): Little, Barack, author
Tenenbaum, Gershon, professor directing thesis
Phillips, Beth, committee member
Paek, Insu, committee member
Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, degree granting department
Florida State University, degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study aimed at examining the dispositional effects of the hot hand and psychological momentum beliefs on mental states such as self-efficacy, perception of control, and cohesion. One hundred and seventy-six male and female participants who have athletic experience in basketball, volleyball, or baseball (NCAA, club, or intramural) were surveyed. Revised versions of hot hand and psychological momentum questionnaires from past studies were used to measure a participant's level of belief in the hot hand and psychological momentum, respectively. The Physical Self-Efficacy Scale (PSE) was used to measure self-efficacy, a revised version of the Self-Control Scale was used to measure perceptions of control, and the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ) was used to measure team cohesion. The aim of this study was to examine whether athletes who have strong beliefs in the hot hand and psychological momentum have significantly different levels of self-efficacy, perceptions of control, and team cohesion. Also, it was examined whether skill level was related to any differences in beliefs. Results indicated that athletes with stronger beliefs in the hot hand exhibited significantly higher levels of self-efficacy. Belief in psychological momentum did not predict any of the dependent variables Also, high skilled athletes showed higher self-efficacy levels than low skilled athletes, and low skilled athletes showed higher levels of team cohesion than high skilled athletes. The results suggest that belief in the hot hand can be considered an adaptive belief that can potentially affect self-efficacy in a positive manner.
Identifier: FSU_migr_etd-9033 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science.
Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2014.
Date of Defense: July 14, 2014.
Keywords: Adaptive, Basketball, Hot Hand, Psychological Momentum, Psychology, Sport
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Gershon Tenenbaum, Professor Directing Thesis; Beth Phillips, Committee Member; Insu Paek, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Educational psychology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-9033
Owner Institution: FSU

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Little, B. (2014). The Hot Hand and Psychological Momentum as Adaptive Beliefs in Sport. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-9033