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Where's the Food? Refining Food Desert Measures to More Accurately Reflect Local Access to Healthy Food and Incidence of Diet-Related Disease Deaths

Title: Where's the Food? Refining Food Desert Measures to More Accurately Reflect Local Access to Healthy Food and Incidence of Diet-Related Disease Deaths.
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Name(s): Wilson, Kellie O'Dare, author
Fazio, Michael, author
Morgan, Derek, author
Bloechle, Amber, author
Vinci, Debra, author
Gutierrez, Anasuya, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: text
Date Issued: 2016-09-01
Physical Form: computer
Physical Form: online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Food is not optional. While Florida approximates the national average for household food insecurity, this number varies considerably by county. However, all counties in the Northwest Florida panhandle region experience food insecurity rates higher than both national and state averages. Although food insecurity is a complex issue caused by various factors, the problem is primarily driven by poverty and lack of local access to food (commonly known as “food deserts”). Furthermore, while virtually all experts in human nutrition agree that adequate consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables (FFV) is integral to a healthy diet and increased longevity, families living in food deserts experience severely restricted access to these items in particular. Given the relationship between lack of access to FFV and increased diet-related morbidity, this study employed quantitative and geospatial methods to examine the distribution of local food retailers that (1) offered a full service selection of FFV and (2) accepted SNAP payments, and examined the rate of diet-related deaths at the census tract level in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. This study found a strong, positive correlation between number of non-full service food retailers (convenience, corner stores) and each form of diet related deaths. The higher the number of non full service stores per tract, the more diet related deaths. In addition, the strongest relationship is observed between diabetes and number of non-FFV retailers.
Identifier: FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1481210152 (IID)
Keywords: diabetes, nutrition, food deserts, diet
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1481210152
Owner Institution: FSU

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Wilson, K. O. 'D., Fazio, M., Morgan, D., Bloechle, A., Vinci, D., & Gutierrez, A. (2016). Where's the Food? Refining Food Desert Measures to More Accurately Reflect Local Access to Healthy Food and Incidence of Diet-Related Disease Deaths. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1481210152