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When power shapes interpersonal behavior

Title: When power shapes interpersonal behavior: Low relationship power predicts men's aggressive responses to low situational power.
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Name(s): Overall, Nickola C, author
Hammond, Matthew D, author
McNulty, James K, author
Finkel, Eli J, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Journal Article
Text
Date Issued: 2016-08-01
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: When does power in intimate relationships shape important interpersonal behaviors, such as psychological aggression? Five studies tested whether possessing low relationship power was associated with aggressive responses, but (a) only within power-relevant relationship interactions when situational power was low, and (b) only by men because masculinity (but not femininity) involves the possession and demonstration of power. In Studies 1 and 2, men lower in relationship power exhibited greater aggressive communication during couples' observed conflict discussions, but only when they experienced low situational power because they were unable to influence their partner. In Study 3, men lower in relationship power reported greater daily aggressive responses toward their partner, but only on days when they experienced low situational power because they were either (a) unable to influence their partner or (b) dependent on their partner for support. In Study 4, men who possessed lower relationship power exhibited greater aggressive responses during couples' support-relevant discussions, but only when they had low situational power because they needed high levels of support. Study 5 provided evidence for the theoretical mechanism underlying men's aggressive responses to low relationship power. Men who possessed lower relationship power felt less manly on days they faced low situational power because their partner was unwilling to change to resolve relationship problems, which in turn predicted greater aggressive behavior toward their partner. These results demonstrate that fully understanding when and why power is associated with interpersonal behavior requires differentiating between relationship and situational power. (PsycINFO Database Record
Identifier: FSU_pmch_27442766 (IID), 10.1037/pspi0000059 (DOI), PMC5069702 (PMCID), 27442766 (RID), 27442766 (EID), 2016-35676-001 (PII)
Grant Number: R03 HD058314
Publication Note: This NIH-funded author manuscript originally appeared in PubMed Central at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5069702.
Subject(s): Adult
Aggression/psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Masculinity
Men/psychology
Power (Psychology)
Sexual Partners/psychology
Spouses/psychology
Young Adult
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_27442766
Host Institution: FSU
Is Part Of: Journal of personality and social psychology.
1939-1315
Issue: iss. 2, vol. 111

Choose the citation style.
Overall, N. C., Hammond, M. D., McNulty, J. K., & Finkel, E. J. (2016). When power shapes interpersonal behavior: Low relationship power predicts men's aggressive responses to low situational power. Journal Of Personality And Social Psychology. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_27442766